Delisle conversion (ºDe)

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Delisle

Abbreviation/Symbol:

°De

Unit of:

Temperature

Wordwide use:

The Delisle scale, named after the French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle, is a temperature scale that was widely used in the 18th and 19th centuries. However, its usage has significantly declined over the years, and it is now considered obsolete in most parts of the world.

The Delisle scale is a backward scale, meaning that as the temperature increases, the value on the scale decreases. The zero point on the Delisle scale is set at the boiling point of water, and the scale extends downwards from there. The scale was primarily used in Russia and other parts of Eastern Europe, where it was commonly used for scientific and engineering purposes.

In modern times, the Delisle scale has been replaced by more widely accepted temperature scales such as Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin. These scales are more standardized and universally recognized, making them more practical for global use. While the Delisle scale may still be encountered in historical documents or older scientific literature, it is no longer used in everyday life or in contemporary scientific research.

Definition:

On the Delisle scale, the boiling point of water is set at 0 degrees, while the freezing point is set at 150 degrees. This means that as the temperature increases, the Delisle value decreases. The scale is considered to be an inverted scale, as higher temperatures are represented by lower numerical values.

While the Delisle scale was widely used in the past, it is not commonly used today due to the introduction of more standardized and widely accepted temperature scales such as Celsius, Fahrenheit, and Kelvin. However, it still holds historical significance and is occasionally referenced in literature or historical documents. For those interested in converting temperatures from Delisle to other scales or vice versa, there are various online conversion tools available that can provide accurate and convenient conversions.

Origin:

The Delisle scale, also known as the Delisle thermometer, was developed by French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle in the early 18th century. Delisle was a prominent figure in the field of astronomy and made significant contributions to the study of comets and the measurement of time. However, he is best known for his work in the field of temperature measurement.

Delisle's scale was based on the principle of using the boiling and freezing points of water as reference points. Unlike other temperature scales of the time, such as the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales, Delisle's scale was inverted. This means that as the temperature increased, the value on the Delisle scale decreased. The boiling point of water was assigned a value of 0° on the Delisle scale, while the freezing point was assigned a value of 150°.

Although the Delisle scale was widely used in Russia and some other European countries for a period of time, it eventually fell out of favor and was replaced by other temperature scales. Today, it is considered an obsolete and rarely used unit of measurement. However, the Delisle scale remains an important part of the history of temperature measurement and serves as a reminder of the various approaches and systems that have been developed over time.

Common references:

Boiling point of Water = 0°De

Freezing point of Water = 150°De

Usage context:

The Delisle scale was primarily used in Russia and some other European countries during the 18th century. It was particularly popular in Russia, where it was used as the official temperature scale until the early 20th century. The scale was used in various fields, including meteorology, scientific research, and everyday temperature measurements. However, with the introduction of the Celsius and Fahrenheit scales, the usage of the Delisle scale gradually declined and it is now considered obsolete.

 

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